3 Ways to Knit a Triangle

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Kerchiefs, shawls and blankets, oh my! Triangles pop up in knitting more than you think, but they don't have to be boring and basic. Try these three techniques to give your next knit some triangular magic.

1. KFB increase triangle

 

Try this triangle if you... want a clean, crisp shape.

This triangle starts at the point and works its way to the top using the KFB (knit front back) increase. The advantage of starting from the point and working your way up is that if you're not sure how tall you want your triangle to be, you can just keep increasing until you get to that point (or until you run out of yarn, in some cases!). You can use any increase you'd like here, just remember that the key is to increase after the first stitch and before the last stitch. This will help you keep a super neat edge. (The K1 on each end and on both the right side and wrong side also help form a neat edge that stops the triangle from curling.)

KFB triangle pattern

  • Cast on 3 stitches.
  • Row 1: K1, KFB, K1 (4 stitches).
  • Row 2: K1, purl to last stitch, K1.
  • Row 3: K1, KFB, knit to last 2 stitches, KFB, K1 (6 stitches).
  • Repeat Rows 2-3 until you've reached the desired height of your triangle.

Let's take a closer look at the KFB increase. KFB means knitting into the front and back of the same stitch. Here's how:

Knit the stitch as usual, but don't drop the stitch from the needle.

Insert your needle into that same stitch again, but his time go through the back loop.

Knit that stitch through the back loop, and you'll see that you've increased 1 stitch.

Now you can drop the stitch from the left needle. That's it, folks!

2. Yarn-over increase triangle

Try this triangle if you... want shape with a decorative edge

This triangle is exactly the same as the KFB increase triangle except that it uses yarn overs to increase the number of stitches. Increasing the number of stitches using yarn overs instead of the usual increase like m1 or KFB results in a decorative edging.

This is often the technique used for triangle shawls. 

Yarn-over triangle pattern

  • Cast on 3 stitches.
  • Row 1: [K1, YO] twice, K1 -- 5 stitches.
  • Row 2: K1, purl to last stitch, K1.
  • Repeat Rows 1-2 until you've reached the desired height of your triangle.

Let's take a closer look at the yarn over increase.

To increase, simply wrap the yarn around your needle counter clockwise.

Then knit the next stitch. That's it! The yarn over will leave a little hole, but don't worry. That's exactly what we want to happen.

3. Textured triangles

Try this triangle if you... want texture rather than shape

If you don't want to shape at all — in other words, you don't want to increase or decrease — then a textured triangle is a great option. This works well for rectangular and square projects like blankets.

Yarns with great stitch definition, like the Cloudborn Superwash Merino Bulky I used, are a great choice here since that texture helps define the shape of the triangles.

This stitch is worked over a multiple of 12 stitches, so cast on any multiple of 12 to begin.

Textured triangle pattern

  • Row 1: *K6, p6; repeat from * to end.
  • Row 2: *P1, k5, p5, k1; repeat from * to end.
  • Row 3: *P2, k4, p4, k2; repeat from * to end.
  • Row 4: *P3, k3; repeat from * to end.
  • Row 5: *P4, k2, p2, k4; repeat from * to end.
  • Row 6: *P5, k1, p1, k5; repeat from * to end.
  • Row 7: *P6, k6; repeat from * to end.
  • Row 8: *K6, p6; repeat from * to end.
  • Row 9: *K5, p1, k1, p5; repeat from * to end.
  • Row 10: *K4, p2, k2, p4; repeat from * to end.
  • Row 11: *K3, p3; repeat from * to end.
  • Row 12: *K2, p4, k4, p2; repeat from * to end.
  • Row 13: *K1, p5, k5, p1; repeat from * to end.
  • Row 14: *P6, k6; repeat from * to end.
  • Repeat Rows 1 - 14.
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3 Ways to Knit a Triangle