Traditional Meets Modern: How to Crochet Granny Ripples

What if you could combine the classic crochet granny square motif with a trendy, popular design like a chevron? You can, and it's surprisingly easy!

The granny ripple uses the double crochet cluster of the granny stitch with strategic increases and decreases to create a variation on the zigzag of the chevron stripe.

Learn how to crochet the granny ripple stitch using this free crochet pattern.

What is the crochet granny ripple?

This stitch pattern uses the classic 3 dc cluster of a granny square or granny stripe to give you the familiar look of that traditional motif. The clusters are worked across rows, with evenly placed increases and decreases that give you the mountain-style peaks and valleys of the chevron .

Tackle the iconic granny stitch!

Learn to make more than just granny squares! By the end of this class, you'll have created triangles, hexagons, octagons — and even garments! Watch FREE in Bluprint Get the Class

Granny ripple free crochet pattern

To teach you how to stitch the granny ripple, you can follow along with this free pattern. Of course, you can take the techniques and apply them to all kinds of projects, from afghans to accessories and more.

Materials

The crochet granny ripple can be worked using any yarn and a matching size crochet hook. For the crochet shawlette pattern:

Row 1:

Using Color A, chain 108.

1. 3 dc into the fifth chain from the hook. This counts as the first dc at the edge of the work and the first 3 dc cluster that forms granny stitch.

2. (Skip 2, 3 dc in next stitch) twice.

3. Ch 3, 3 dc into same stitch as the previous 3 dc cluster. This creates your first increase or "peak.".

Tip: Some crocheters prefer to ch 2 instead of ch 3 on the increase. Either option works — choose whichever you like best.

4. Repeat Step 2: (Skip 2, 3 dc in next stitch) twice.

5. Skip 5, 3 dc in next stitch. This creates your first decrease or "valley."

6. Repeats Steps 2-5 across row.

7. End with 1 dc in the last stitch. Each rows begins and ends with a single dc stitch, which  for an even edge.

Rows 2-5:

From here on out, you'll work between the dc clusters, making increases in every increase and decreases in every decrease, with two clusters of 3 dc between each increase and decrease. Easy! Here's what it looks like:

Chain 4 to turn.

(3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc) into the chain space on the increase in the row below.

(Ch 3, 3dc into chain space) twice.

Skip 5, 3 dc in next chain space.

(Ch 3, dc) in the next chain space.

End with a double crochet to create an even edge.

 

Continue as long as you like. If you want to change colors, do so at the beginning of a new row.

How to adapt the size of the crochet granny ripple

If you continue in this manner for 20 rows in four colors, you'll have a cute shawlette. For a larger shawl, you can either continue adding rows or e replace the DK weight yarn with a bulky weight (or double strand of worsted weight) and use a size K hook, working with the exact same pattern.

You can also change the length of your starting chain to any multiple of 18. Begin with 36 chains for a dishcloth or 216 chains for a large blanket.

Want wider ripples? Work more groups of 3 dc clusters in between each increase and decrease (four instead of 2 between each set, for example).

Tackle the iconic granny stitch!

Learn to make more than just granny squares! By the end of this class, you'll have created triangles, hexagons, octagons — and even garments! Watch FREE in Bluprint Get the Class

February 11, 2018
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Traditional Meets Modern: How to Crochet Granny Ripples