I-cord: What It Is and How to Knit It

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I-cord: no, it's not some accessory for your iPhone. In fact, it's a little bit of knitting magic. Sometimes, instead of a flat knitted fabric, your project calls for something more like a long, skinny rope. That’s where I-cord comes in. I-cord creates a long, curling, round project that, as the name suggests, looks like a cord.

So, what does the "I" stand for? Idiot. I kid you not. This cord is so easy to knit, it's almost idiot proof (or so the name would have us believe).

How to knit I-cord

First, you will need two double-point needles or a circular needle (just something with points on both ends). I-cord generally uses somewhere between 3-5 stitches. After you’ve cast on, knit your first row of stitches, but then don’t turn your work.

Instead, slide your stitches to the other end of the needle they’re on. (This is why you use double points.) Now you’ve got the right side facing you and the working yarn at the left-most stitch on your left hand needle.

Knit into the right-most stitch on your left hand needle, pulling the working yarn across the back of your stitches to begin the next row. Pulling this yarn across the back is what closes up your tube. Give it a good tug as you work that first stitch. Then just keep repeating that process until your cord is the length you want it to be. Bind off in your usual fashion.

How to use I-cord</h2>

Now that you know how to make, why would you ever want to? I-cord has so many uses: think shoulder straps on a tank top, or ties on a baby hat. You can use it as an embellishment too: stitch it onto your project to make a cabled pattern, or top off a hat with an I-cord knot.

And then there’s the coolest thing I’ve ever done with I-cord: this knitted Christmas tree. My knitting club made yards and yards of I-cord to cover every branch of this little tree (after a dutiful husband stripped all of the fake leaves off the branches, leaving us bare wire we could slip the I-cord over). What will you do with your I-cord creation?

 

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I-cord: What It Is and How to Knit It