These 5 Photographers Are Turning Barbies Into Art

Actions

The world of Instagram is filled with cool artists pushing the limits of fashion and photography. But throw Barbies into the mix — you read that right — and you’ve got something truly original. On the heels of the release of Welcome to Marwen , where Steve Carell plays an artist who creates a miniature scenes as he recovers from a brain injury, doll-vignette photography is claiming the spotlight. These five artists will show you why.

Wayne Frendo of @Plasticfashionista

Photo by @Plasticfashionista

“This is my interpretation of the fashion world in a 1:6 scale,” says Frendo of his photographs. “My photos are almost always all about the clothes.” His dolls walk the Instagram catwalk dressed to the nines in chic rompers paired with dangling earrings, sky-high stilettos and ball gowns, trendy tracksuits and everything in between. “I’m inspired by what I see in fashion blogs, websites and magazines … and of course what I see in real life,” he adds.

Izabela Kwella of @Bella_BarbieDoll

Photo by @Bella_BarbieDoll

Kwella started taking these photos as a “silly hobby” three years ago, and was surprised when it took off. “Fashion is definitely one of the things that inspires me,” she says. “Sometimes I think my dolls dress better than I do!” She often takes photos outside, searching for spots where she can play with scale so the dolls look like they’re in their natural habitat. For indoor work, Kwella uses dioramas where she makes her own furniture and decor.

Adele Quel of @Lara_art_dolls

Photo by @lara_art_dolls

Quel’s style is decidedly boho chic, with dolls generally posing outdoors and often donning flower crowns. “This hobby is a combination of my love for dolls and taking pictures,” she explains. “Also, Barbies are the best models! They always look good, and don’t freeze outside in the winter in a dress.”

Staci Mastrianni of @Thedolljunkie

Photo by @Thedolljunkie

Mastrianni has a pretty simple reason for doing the work she does: She just LOVES dolls. “This all started out as a way to share my collection,” she says, “and over the years I've honed my skills and found out that I love photography, too.” Her feed focuses on beauty shots, often set against colorful printed backgrounds. But lately she’s been trying something new: Barbie boudoir! Ooh la la.

Beth Largent of @Barbieandbuddy

Photo by @Barbieandbuddy

“I began taking pictures of my Elf on the Shelf, and was given a Barbie as a joke gift so he wouldn’t be lonely,” says Largent of how her foray into doll photography began. She now styles her Barbie dolls — and sometimes Buddy the elf, too — into a few different diorama scenes, purchasing their clothes from small Etsy makers. But what really sets this feed apart is her captions: “This is almost like a virtual diary as my dolls talk about what’s happening in my life or trends I see around me,” Largent adds. The only rule: No talking politics!

Become a member for exclusive access to endless creative inspiration.
NEXT FOR YOU
Everyone is always asking me what piece of fancy gear will make their photos better. The truth is, while new equipment is nice, it’s unlikely to improve your work on its own. In fact, extraordinary photos are made all the time on basic equipment (you've seen those iPhone ads!). Instead, I clue newbies in on the real secret for awesome shots: Make more photographs, don't snap more frames. Commit that motto to memory, grab your camera, and let's get started.
You’ve heard it before: It’s all about perspective. This is true in life, and perhaps even more true in photography. We live in a three-dimensional world, but our cameras only capture two-dimensional images. So what’s the remedy? Making sure your shots include a sense of depth and scale. Here are five ways to do just that.
Jeremiah Gilbert
Shooting events can be glamorous work. You're out there, mingling with people who are (hopefully!) having fun, your mission to capture the drama, color and buzz with your camera.
Laurence Norah
Now Reading
These 5 Photographers Are Turning Barbies Into Art