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If you've ever wanted to tell a fun story via drawings and thumbnails, good news: you don't have to invest in a ton of materials. This mini comic book is made with a single sheet of paper and, with help from a printer or photocopier, it's quick to create and gift.
David Huyck
Coloring books are commonly thought to be a pastime for children, but they actually have benefits for everyone regardless of age. In fact, coloring mandalas, words of inspiration and nature scenes helps reduce stress and promote mindfulness, according to the Mayo Clinic. Whether you draw your own coloring pages — you can learn how in our class Draw a Coloring Book — or print out the free ones below, there's no better way to unwind after a busy day.
The number one thing you need to remember about drawing realistic hair: don't get caught up in all those individual strands. As with so many aspects of drawing, less is more, and overworking any area can detract from the rest of the image. Instead, you want to use value and shape to define your subject's hair. Here's how.
Paul Heaston
When it comes to drawing facial features, the eyes can be challenging because, well, realistically capturing "the windows to the soul" is no easy task. And while you probably learned a simple formula when you were a child — draw a football with two circles inside for the iris and pupil — no eye actually looks like that.
Paul Heaston
The mouth is one of the most expressive features of the face, but it doesn't have to be difficult to draw. First, you want to keep a few things in mind when placing the mouth on the head:
Sandrine Pelissier
So you've mastered drawing a head — now, perfecting the facial features of your subject is a must.
Paul Heaston
This Easter basket is filled with brightly-colored eggs, pink chicks, jewel-like jelly beans and a big chocolate bunny. What could be sweeter? With this simple tutorial, you can dream up your perfect basket, then bring it to life with watercolor.
Margie Moore
Let's be real: you don't have to be a kid to love coloring. Adult coloring books are super popular for good reason — not only do you have a beautiful piece of art when you're finished, but a 2017 study found that coloring reduces stress and anxiety while encouraging perseverance.
Jessie Oleson Moore
Paint a duckling that'll waddle right into your heart. It's the perfect Easter — or springtime— project!
Margie Moore
No matter your medium, there's a holiday-themed drawing waiting to be put down on paper. Whether you're looking for gift ideas or just want a fun, creative project with the fam, there are plenty of festive motifs and scenes to choose from. So go on and crank those Christmas tunes and start drawing!
Margie Moore
Artists have taken inspiration from mountains since ... forever. Whether up close or far away, covered in snow or in trees, rounded or jagged, they tend to symbolize something vast and vital. And when you draw them, you want that feeling to come to life on the page. Here's how.
Veronica Winters
There are so many different ways to wield your pen and ink brush. One day you might be looking to draw a realistic, detailed still life, while the next you want to go for something a bit more vibrant and loosey-goosey. Regardless of where your instincts take you, there's a pen and ink drawing you'll love making, all while sharpening your skills.
If there's anything we love just as much as drawing, it's animals. And we mean all kinds — from dogs and cats to birds and bears. No matter your medium of choice, we've got a critter just waiting to inspire you!
Whether you're a watercolorist, acrylic maven or colored pencil crazy, there's a flower-fabulous project for you to tackle. Don't sweat it if you've got a black thumb — these blooms will never wilt and will always brighten your day.
If one art medium is good, two or more is even better, right? Mixing up your materials is a great way to open up new creative territory with your artwork. Give it a try and if you're lucky, you'll surprise yourself!
When I'm out and about in the world — especially when I'm traveling — I've learned to pare down my sketching tools to the simplest array possible: two brush pens, a water brush and a sketchbook. Sometimes I'll bring along a small kit of watercolors, but usually I leave color for later. What I'm really interested in is the spur-of-the-moment opportunity to capture what what's caught my eye, without any muss or fuss. And for that, I rely heavily on my brush pens.
Kateri Ewing
Urban sketching is all about capturing the energy of the world around you, doing it quickly, and keeping it loosey goosey. That said, the best sketching isn't a total free for all; there's still plenty of technique involved. Keep these principles in mind next time you take your art to the street, then see where the mood takes you!
When you hear "colored pencils," you might tend to think about elementary school. But you're all grown up now, and so is this versatile medium. In fact, you'll be amazed at the sophisticated effects you can create once you master a few key techniques.
It's no secret that if you want to improve your art, you've gotta practice. But that doesn't have to mean repeating the same thing over and over again. In fact, the more you mix it up, the more you'll grow — we promise!
Sure, you could make beautiful art without ever learning how to blend your colored pencils. But blending takes things to a whole other level: it lets you smooth out hues and eliminate lines so your finished work looks more like a painting. Worth it.
Veronica Winters
Here's what's so great about colored pencils: they make even simple drawings look totally profesh. And once you get skilled in this medium, whoa. The photo-realistic effects you can create are absolutely incredible.
Walking into an art-supply store and buying ALL the things is pretty exciting. But if you're drawing in pen and ink, all you need are a couple of basic supplies. Here's what to think about before you shop.
Sara Barnes, Jessie Oleson Moore and Paul Heaston
Mistakes? What mistakes? Maybe you don't make any ever — but that would be super weird. If you do mess up now and then, like basically everyone who draws, here are some sneaky ways to hide your bloopers.
Jessie Oleson Moore
If you're a pen-and-ink newbie, you may already know that hatching and crosshatching are two important (and very cool) moves. But if that's all you know, get ready for an ink-splattered surprise: There are so many other fabulous methods for creating shape, texture, dimension and more.
Paul Heaston
Paul Heaston
Knowing how to make jewelry: Yeah, we all know how amazing that is. But it's also important to know how to draw jewelry. And there are a few reasons why.
Antonella Avogadro
You're working on a portrait, closer than ever to capturing the likeness in the face, but then you hit a snag — the clothes. The fabric folds are giving you serious jitters.
Veronica Winters
You're getting ready to leave for a birthday party and suddenly realize, d'oh! You still need a card! You've got two options: You can run to the store and grab the first non-terrible card you see, or you can grab some paper and produce one yourself.
Jessie Oleson Moore
You might think that drawing is like touching your tongue to your nose: Some people can do it and some people can’t. But that’s actually not true. Drawing is more like driving: The more you practice, the better you get.
Jessie Oleson Moore
When I was a kid, I'd play a game called "What should I draw?" Someone would ask, "What should I draw?" Someone would answer, "A bear." Then you would draw a bear. Pretty basic, right?
David Huyck
Everybody has at least one defining feature, the thing that makes them look like themselves and nobody else. When you're drawing somebody's portrait, you want to get that feature just right.
Sara Barnes
Big eyes, exaggerated expressions and cute little chibi characters are only some of the appeal of drawing anime. But before you launch into a manga drawing tutorial, it helps to have a few words of wisdom from a manga pro. To be a better artist, here are some essential, actionable tips — and some pointers on avoiding beginner mistakes.
Alex and Monique
Sharpen your pencils, grab your best eraser — and maybe even round up a few new materials to try! These projects have our hearts for sheer fun factor, and because each one has something valuable to teach a budding (or already blossoming!) artist.
Drawing with pencil is an art form that you can jump into at any age. It requires very few supplies and — honestly! — isn't hard to learn. In fact, if you know how to hold and use a pencil (check!), you already have the basic graphite skills needed to start working with this versatile medium.
Jessie Oleson Moore
If you want your drawings to leap right off the page, you need to master 3D shapes. Implying multi-dimensional form with just paper and a pencil is a simple skill, but also a crucial foundation for realistic drawing. Once you know how to do it, you can apply your knowledge in endless ways.
Sara Barnes
Andy Warhol's soup cans, Roy Lichtenstein's cartoon panels, David Hockney's swimming pools — meet the icons of Pop art! Pop art elevates everyday objects in a bright, fun and bold visual style that, well, pops.
Jessie Oleson Moore
You know those amazing flower drawings that almost look real? That's the magic of colored pencil, and learning how to do it is easier than it seems. Start with a photo you love, or even a real bloom, and see how far you can get!
Sara Barnes
You've probably never made your own sketchbook — it's easy enough to buy one, after all. Possibly the thought of making this thing never even occurred to you.
Hannah Cooper
If there's any other part of the human body that's as tricky to draw as faces, it's hands. They seem simple: just five fingers and a palm. But people can hold their hands in so many different positions. To draw hands well, you need to understand the basics of anatomy and proportions.
Paul Heaston
Lifestyle
You've made up your mind to finally take a crack at knitting, cake decorating, paper crafting … whatever. But how to make it happen when there are so many options? The truth: Just. Go. Start.
Liz Callahan Schnabolk
Whether you're working in watercolor, pen and ink, pencil, colored pencil or something else entirely, one thing's for sure: You're not creating anything if you don't have paper. And using the right kind can make all the difference.
Jessie Oleson Moore
If the rise of the Google Doodle has taught us anything, it's that doodling isn't just absent-minded scribbling. In fact, the opposite is true! According to a much-viewed TED Talk, doodling can have a profound impact on the way we process information and figure out solutions to problems.
Jessie Oleson Moore
Crosshatching is one of those terms that makes you go "Huh?" even though you probably know what it is. You just might not know that you know.
Sara Barnes
There's something magical — and let's be real, stress-relieving — about making art every day. But sometimes you're fresh out of ideas for what to actually draw. That's where these drawing exercises come in — the daily prompts are simple enough to sketch out during a busy week, but still plenty of fun to help fuel your creative fire.
Sara Barnes
Drawing heads and faces that look like actual humans is tricky. Brace yourself for an instant "Nope!" if something seems off, because people spend all day looking at each other. You can't really fool anyone.
Paul Heaston
If you want to be a next-level artist, learning technique is only the beginning. Your drawings need to express your own personal style and say, "Hey, it's ME."
Jessie Oleson Moore
Let's get some perspective on three-point perspective drawing. First of all, what exactly is it? Here's a quick refresher for anyone who can nail one-point and two-point perspective drawing and feels ready to take on the big three.
Paul Heaston
Perspective is a drawing technique that shows objects in all their 3-D glory even on a flat piece of paper or canvas. The trick: using lines that recede to express a sense of distance.
Paul Heaston
You might think that learning lettering requires just a paper and pen — and you’re right! But you’ll find it’s much easier to learn this new skill if you get a little more specific with your supplies. I’ve broken it down into three major categories to help guide your shopping.
Samantha Zabell
The great thing about drawing is that you don't need special supplies. Go ahead and use the tiny pencil from mini golf or the paper bag that once carried your Chinese takeout.
Veronica Winters
Pencil lines go askew, marks end up where you don't want them, composition ideas change. People make mistakes, especially when they are new to drawing.
Jessie Oleson Moore
Watercolor pencils look like regular colored pencils, and you pretty much use them the same way... with one exception. When you add water to your drawing, something incredible happens: you've suddenly got watercolor art.
Sandrine Pelissier
Bringing a person to life with just a pencil and a piece of paper is a magical thing — and a really good reason to learn how to sketch.
Antonella Avogadro
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