Sew Articles
Tag
Newest
Sew
Pattern grading is an easy way to replicate a pattern to scale, saving you from having to draft the whole thing. It can be your go-to if you need to size an entire pattern up a smidge. (Though you shouldn't try to go more than two sizes up or down, as that would disrupt the balance of the pattern.) There are a couple different ways to pattern grade, but let's focus on two of the most common methods.
Pauline Alice
Sew
For kids who want to sew — but may not be ready for a sharp needle or complex sewing machine — this personalized piece of wall decor is a great starter project. Not only will they be proud to gift it or hang it in their room, but working the stitches helps them practice an even, repeating pattern that builds fine motor skills. It's a win all around!
Sherri Sylvester
Sew
Clothing and accessories are an awesome way for kids — and everyone, really — to express their creativity. But instead of buying new stuff, help your little fashionistas upgrade what they've got with some cool DIY felt patches. They're easy to make and look great ironed on everything from backpacks to jean jackets.
Sherri Sylvester
Sew
Given all the uncertainty swirling about COVID-19, there's a lot of desire to help. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say staying home, washing your hands and practicing social distancing are some of the best things to do at this time, they're also encouraging everyone wear a cloth face cover when out in public.
Sew
Truth: there's nothing fun about having your skirt cling to your body. Not only can it feel uncomfortable, but it also prevents the skirt from hanging as intended. But with a simple handmade slip you designed yourself, you can rock any skirt with style — meaning this old classic just became a wardrobe must-have once more.
Christine Haynes
Sew
Whether you're lounging on the weekend or working from home, there's nothing better than a great-fitting pair of yoga pants (aka leggings) to make your day-to-day more comfy. Here's what you need to know to sew a pair — or five.
Christine Haynes
Sew
Truth: a shower curtain can make or break your bathroom. If you're revamping your space (or moving into a new place altogether), this simple DIY can save you hours of searching for that perfect patterned curtain. And there's no need to install grommets or special hardware — this curtain can be made using only your sewing machine.
Beth Galvin
Sew
Buttons are so much more than closures — they're also a way to tie your piece together and give it a flawless finishing touch. While these little additions can seem intimidating at first, with this step-by-step tutorial you'll have them fastened on in no time.
Christine Haynes
Sew
Bias tape is a great way to bind, or seal in, raw edges. And while it’s commonly used as quilt binding, you can actually incorporate it into a variety of projects, whether you need to sew a face mask or want to add a fun design element to a garment. Here’s how to create the durable, stretchy tape — even if you don’t have a bias tape maker on hand.
Selvages run the entire length of a fabric bolt, and many people consider them to be garbage, cutting them off and throwing away without a second thought. But this finished end of your fabric can be handy in a project. After all, it's so tightly woven you don't have to worry about fraying. Here are some tips for putting 'em to good use.
Angela Mitchell
Picture this: you go to the fabric store, pick out the perfect materials for your next project, and come home only to realize that — doh — you already have great fabric you could have used tucked away in a forgotten corner of your sewing room.
Lindsay Conner
If you're a quilter or sewist, you've probably come across bias tape before. And while it's commonly used for quilt binding, there are a ton of ways you can incorporate bias tape into any project. The best part, though, may be just how easy it is to make yourself.
Sew
Ruching is when fabric is gathered along a seam to provide decoration or fullness. You may have seen it before on sheers (like in the skirt pictured above) or swimsuits, but there are so many opportunities for ruching in patternmaking. The technique looks particularly great on a fitted garment, where it accentuates your body's curves.
Maris Olsen
Sew
Apparently, sometimes we creative types think rather differently than the rest of the world. But we're all in the making game together — so whether you're a newbie sewist or a master of the craft, we bet you can't help nodding along to these truths only sewers understand.
Beth Galvin
Sew
When you're making a statement in a vintage-style dress, you need to have a petticoat. It's just a fact. Petticoats can turn a simple A-line dress into a real stunner — just check out the image below.
Sew
Fitting can be a challenge for even the most seasoned garment sewers. But that's where a moulage, or "mold," fitting system comes in. It was developed and used in couture houses to reduce client fitting times, yet home sewers can use the technique to draft personal slopers for a blouse, dress, jacket or an overcoat.
Maris Olsen
Sew
If you're under 5'4", you're considered a size petite by the fashion industry — as well as the pattern companies industry. And when you're searching for a pattern, you want one that helps you look taller and gives great proportions to flatter your shape. Keep these tips in mind while you're browsing to help you find the perfect pattern for your next garment.
Pauline Alice
Sew
When fitting a sewing pattern, you typically check standard measurements such as the bust, waist and hip — all measurements of circumference. But there's another that's critical to getting the perfect fit: vertical dimension. This measurement isn't usually marked on most patterns, but you should measure and adjust your patterns for it (in both dimensions, actually) to get the fit you need — especially if you're plus-size or full-busted.
Beth Galvin
Sew
If you're going to sew your own clothes — or even alter store-bought ones — you have to know how to hem. The good news is it's a super easy skill to pick up, as the bottom edge is simply turned up and stitched into place. (Things get more complicated when dealing with extras like lining, a kick pleat or a cuff.) The method below can be used whether you're hemming a dress, a pair of pants, a skirt, a sleeve — anything you put your mind to!
Linda Reynolds
Sew
Getting the fit just right is one of the most challenging parts of sewing clothes, mostly because the process isn't a singular step. Rather, it begins before the first pattern piece is even cut, and continues throughout your sewing.
Linda Reynolds
Sew
If you love sewing your own clothes, you've probably come across a princess seam. The seams are common design lines on many tops, dresses and jackets. Their slimming effect is flattering on almost any figure, but for them to look just right they need to fit your body properly — which means they need to follow the natural curves of the bust line.
Linda Reynolds
Sew
One of the biggest differences between regular garment sewing and couture sewing is underlining. Underlining is what gives couture garments their superior overall appearance and elevates any homemade article of clothing to a designer-grade product. But, what exactly is underlining? Why do you need it, and how do you use it?
Linda Reynolds
Sew
As you get deeper into sewing, your needs and investment level may change with time. Maybe you started sewing on a family hand-me-down, and the machine finally bit the dust. Or maybe you learned to sew on a basic model, but now you're ready to upgrade to something higher-quality.
Christine Haynes
Sew
Traditional Easter baskets are so overdone. With this cute bunny tote bag in hand, your kiddo is practically guaranteed to find all the eggs (and look so cute along the way).
Beth Galvin
Sew
A custom duvet sounds like a major splurge. After all, it's designed to fit your bed perfectly and comes in any color or pattern you want for your dream bedroom. But what if we told you that, in this case, custom is cheaper than off the rack? It's true — because you can make this one yourself!
Sew
Real talk: if you sew your own clothes, it's probably because you want a custom fit. And that usually means you adjust the pattern before taking scissors to fabric. But if you're not also fitting while you sew, you're missing out on an opportunity to make your garment as perfect as can be.
Beth Galvin
Sew
An exposed zipper instantly makes any top, skirt or dress look totally modern. But in order for them to look stellar, all stitching (which, unlike when sewing an invisible zipper, is done on the right side of the garment) needs to be done with precision and careful planning. Here's how to get all those little details right.
Linda Reynolds
Sew
Go retro and stitch high-waisted underwear that's totally comfortable and classic, not to mention customizable thanks to the ability to mix and match woven and knit fabrics. And if you have leftover fabric post-project, there's great news: you can use it to make a matching vintage-inspired bralette, meaning you'll never have to scour the lingerie section for perfect-fitting undergarments ever again.
Christine Haynes
Sew
Easter is just a hop away, so it's time to stitch all things bunnies. Choose one of these rabbit-inspired crafts and you'll have a holiday keepsake for years to come.
Veronica Lovvorn
Sew
There's an easy (and fun!) way to make fabric you won't see anywhere else: block printing. By carving a block and using it to stamp a pattern onto fabric — which you can learn to do in Fabric Design: Block Printing — you'll never stress about finding the perfect material for any sewing, quilting or home decor project ever again. But block printing is only half the fun: what you make with that one-of-a-kind fabric is what'll give you that awesome 'I did it!' moment.
Sew
Say buh-bye to the days of searching for that perfect bolt of fabric. Block printing is the easy way to create custom fabrics for one-of-a-kind sewing, quilting and home decor projects. If you're new to customizing fabrics, Jen Hewett, textile artist and instructor of Fabric Design: Block Printing, has must-know tips for beginners.
Sew
Elastic waistbands are a go-to for comfort, but just like there are different types of elastic, there are different kinds of elastic waistbands you can sew.
Maris Olsen
Sew
There's no denying the best gifts are always handmade. These projects range from quirky to cute to romantic, meaning they're perfect for everyone in need of a little extra love come Valentine's Day.
Sew
Love is in the air (and in your craft room) this Valentine's Day. Whether you're a sewist, quilter or prefer machine embroidery, these patterns are sure to make your heart skip a beat.
Irene Valle
Sew
There are a ton of ways to sew a tote bag — with a lining, without a lining, with pockets on the inside, with pockets on the outside, with a quilted design — the list goes on and on. This tutorial breaks it down to the basics, teaching you how to make a simple tote with three panels. Once you've got that down, you can customize your bag however you want!
Christine Haynes
Sew
This quick-and-easy potholder is awww-dorable, and it'll look perfect in your kitchen come Valentine's Day. An added bonus: it's great for using fabric scraps!
Christine Haynes
Sew
Lining a garment can seem like a lot of extra work: buying more fabric, cutting out the pattern again and all that extra pinning and sewing. It's enough "extra" to make the idea of skipping this step awfully tempting. But some garments really do require a lining to be functional. Here's what you need to know before starting to sew one.
Julia Garza
Crafting for the holidays is supposed to be fun — but so often our yarn balls turn into stress balls as we try to meet deadlines and get everything done. But with a little planning, you can keep yourself happily making as the holidays approach. Sounds magical, right?
Kathryn Vercillo
Sew
Let's be honest: you can never have too many headbands. Especially when you make them all yourself! Here are some go-to patterns that are easy to stitch and show off.
Veronica Lovvorn
Sew
There's nothing better than listening to Christmas music, sipping on eggnog and breaking out your holiday fabric for the season. Whether you're in the mood to stitch a new tree skirt, some fresh stockings or more holiday decor, we've got a pattern for your perfect project.
Veronica Lovvorn
Sew
Take a look at your jeans or a men’s dress shirt and it's likely you’ll spot flat fell seams. On the outside of the garment there's a pair of stitch lines, while the inside is all tidy without any raw seam edges. If you've wondered how it's done, it's not magic — sewing a flat fell seam is a technique every garment sewer can (and should!) learn.
Christine Haynes
Sew
When you set out to sew the perfect jacket or coat, you may not immediately think about the sleeves. (You're probably envisioning a poppin' collar or those beautiful lapels and buttons, which is fair!) But sleeves are an obviously critical component of your design. They need to fit, taper and drape perfectly, as a properly sewn sleeve can be the difference between a coat that looks high-end and a coat that screams homemade.
Beth Galvin
Sew
There are two ways to handsew hooks and eyes to garments — the easy, rather straightforward way, and what is considered "the couture way." The primary difference is one looks prettier than the other. And, as you may have already guessed, the pretty one requires a bit more care to sew.
Linda Reynolds
Sew
One of the best reasons to sew is to make clothing that is as unique and creative as you are — and to have a great time doing it. Combine all these things (uniqueness, creativity, fun) and you might end up exploring one of my favorite types of embellishment: beading!
Marie Koupparis
Sew
Whether you're hosting a formal affair or just a casual family dinner, a tablecloth goes a long way in tying the dining room together. The good news is tablecloths are one of the easiest projects you can sew — here's how to make sure yours is done right.
Linda Reynolds
Sew
In sewing, ease is a total necessity. Without it, you wouldn’t be able to bend, reach, sit or walk in your clothes, as it's the extra space built into a garment to make it easy, fun and flattering to wear.
Linda Reynolds
Sew
You've got a fun, strappy top you love to wear, but there's one pesky problem: those straps always slip off your shoulders. Rather than constantly push them back into place, you can shorten them super fast — we're talkin' minutes here — and even make them adjustable. Problem solved!
Vanessa Nirode
Sew
Sewing your own bras can be intimidating, but there are so many reasons to do it. Not only does it call for such little fabric — making it a great way to use up fabric scraps or splurge on something fancy — but it's also a good way to save money. After all, store-bought bras are expensive!
Christine Haynes
Sew
A cowl is a timeless look that's almost always flattering, no matter your body type. You can add one almost anywhere — not just at the bodice front, the most obvious spot, but also the bodice back, the sleeves or even the sides of skirts or pants. Cowls can be subtle with a gentle fall, or dramatic with a plunging silhouette. It's one of those versatile design elements, so sewists really can't help but love it.
Maris Olsen
Sew
When it comes to making alterations to your WIP garment, there's a secret weapon just waiting to be used: curved rulers. These get the job done much better than simple straight rulers could — after all, our bodies aren't filled with straight edges and hard lines. Humans are curvy!
Linda Reynolds
Sew
It's cold outside and there's nothing like a warm and comfy throw to take the chill off. And while you could always buy a cozy blanket, making your own is simple and fast, so you can start sewing in an afternoon and have it ready for that night's movie.
Linda Reynolds
Sew
Zippers can feel super intimidating to beginner sewers, but they’re actually pretty easy to pull off, and some are easier to insert than others. Like the invisible zipper. When you add one, there’s no machine stitching visible from the right side of the project. Everything is done behind the scenes, totally concealed within the seam allowances.
Linda Reynolds
Now Reading