Crochet Balls of Any Size With This Simple Ratio

Whether you use them as tiny Christmas ornaments, giant poufs or anything in between, crocheting balls is fun. And the best part is, once you've crocheted one size, you can figure out how to crochet any size with a little help from a simple formula.

The half-double crochet stitch is the star of this show: it allows you to apply a basic ratio of 1:1 to the increase and decrease rounds (which shape the curves at the top and the bottom of the ball), and the 'straight' rounds (which form the fat center of the ball).

Let's look at the general formula together, then walk through a specific example for making a tiny ball.

Crochet Ball Formula

What You Need

  • Crochet hook (use one hook size smaller than the size suggested on the yarn label)
  • Yarn (the weight you choose will affect the size of your balls)
  • Yarn needle
  • Stuffing

Pro Tip

Using a smaller hook will create smaller holes in your work, which means your stuffing won’t poke out!

Abbreviations

Instructions

Closed Start

Each ball starts with 7 sc made into a magic ring .

Increase Rounds

The rest of the curve is then made in half-double crochet, with 7 increases in each round.

Increase by 7 hdc in each round until you reach the circumference you require. Count your rounds! 

Straight Rounds

Next you're going to work rounds straight (hdc in each stitch without any increases). The number of straight rounds you work depends on the number of increase rounds you worked. It's a 1:1 ratio, so if you made 10 increase rounds, you will need to make 10 straight rounds.

Decrease Rounds

To form the top curve to close the ball, decrease by 7 stitches in each round until you have 7 stitches left, stuffing as you go.  

Hdc2tog 3 times, leaving the remaining stitch unworked.  

Finishing

Fasten off, leaving a 4" (10 cm) tail of yarn.  Use a yarn needle and the end tail of yarn to close the hole formed by the last 4 stitches.  Make sure that your ball is well stuffed before closing it completely.  Work away your tails of yarn.

Smallest Ball Pattern

 
The smallet version of this pattern has just two increase rounds (the stitches worked into your magic loop count as an increase round!), two straight rounds, and two decrease rounds.

Rnd 1: Create a magic ring, then ch 1, 7 sc into the ring. (7)
Rnd 2: Make 2 hdc in each st around. (14)
Rnds 3 - 4: Hdc in each stitch. (14)
This is a good time to start stuffing your ball.

Rnd 5:  Hdc2tog 7 times. (7) 
Continue stuffing as you work. 

Rnd 6: Hdc2tog 3 times. (4)

Leave the remaining stitch unworked and skip to the Finishing section in the generic pattern above. 


Find Your Next Project

If you're hooked on crocheting in the round and working those increases, these projects are for you.

Practice the center-out round method to create your third project, a cute bulky hat that's worked from the top down. Start with a magic circle and work increases to shape your hat. Then see how to change colors to finish it off.
Using your yarn to make something that can hold more yarn? Alllll the yes. Of course, these crochet baskets are super versatile, so feel free to think beyond yarn storage, too.
Beginner
New to crochet? Need a refresher? This lesson covers everything you'll need to know to create crocheted creatures.

Start a free trial for unlimited access to every project, pattern, recipe and tutorial on Bluprint.
More to Explore
Increase and decrease with confidence! From basic techniques to fun shapes and stitch patterns, learn how to give your projects great shape.
Tamara  Kelly
Tamara Kelly
Everything you need to get started with crochet, plus four fun projects to practice your stitches.
Salena Baca
Salena Baca
If you've been perusing crochet boards on Pinterest and had a jonesing to start the craft, you've come to the right place. Even if you've never held a hook before or don't know a slip knot from a single crochet, this guide will help you pick up basic techniques and tips. Soon enough you'll be ready to crochet in rows, which is all you need to make a scarf or even a simple blanket.
Kathryn Vercillo