Lace
Crochet doesn't always get a lot of love when it comes to garments, but we're here to change all that. From cardigans, to vests, and even a baby sweater — don't miss out on making these gorgeous clothes.
Bluprint
Reminiscent of the peaks of the Sierra Mountains, this gorgeous shawl shifts colors and lace patterns as you move from section to section. It may look like a lot of lace, but the patterns repeat and build on each other, so you start simple and gradually get more complex.
Beginner
Our favorite kind of sweater is the kind you never want to take off. That's why the Tealeaf is a must make — the shape is easy to wear, but the details make it special. Think lace, pockets, shoulder saddles, and more.
Beginner
Whether you keep it simple or go intricate, knitting lace just makes everything more elegant. Check out our fave lace projects — from a starter shawl to a full-on crazy lace cardigan.
Bluprint
If you feel even the slightest temptation to try lace knitting, give in to it. Knit lace is a classy fabric to work with, and even the simplest stitch patterns look intricate and impressive.
Lisa Gutierrez
The world of brioche is expanding, and we have a new obsession: brioche lace.
Ashley Little
Master brioche lace knitting as you create a stunning shawl.
Lesley Anne Robinson
Lesley Anne Robinson
Just thinking about winter sweaters this time of year makes knitters break out in a sweat. But you can keep stitching and show off our skills in warm weather with an open, lacy knit top.
Ashley Little
Want to try a new style of crochet? Irish crochet is a form of vintage crochet lace with patterns dating back to the earliest days of the craft. It's said that crochet helped Irish women to earn money during the potato famine, as they made and sold beautiful, delicate lace doilies to the English.
Kathryn Vercillo
Lace scarves are beautiful, but the thing I secretly like most about them is how fast they knit up and how far they extend your yarn. Openwork knits go oh-so-fast once you've internalized the repeats, and blocking them is magic. Watching a lumpy, crumpled strip transform into something long and elegant is the knitting equivalent of sorcery.
Kristen Hanley Cardozo
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