Sew
Sew
Ruching is when fabric is gathered along a seam to provide decoration or fullness. You may have seen it before on sheers (like in the skirt pictured above) or swimsuits, but there are so many opportunities for ruching in patternmaking. The technique looks particularly great on a fitted garment, where it accentuates your body's curves.
Maris Olsen
Sew
With all the uncertainty swirling around the country about COVID-19, there's a lot of pent-up desire to do something, anything to help. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say staying home, washing your hands and practicing social distancing are some of the best things to do at this time, as makers we also have a unique ability to, well, make. And with the current shortage of face masks, many sewers want to take action.
Bluprint
Sew
Apparently, sometimes we creative types think rather differently than the rest of the world. But we're all in the making game together — so whether you're a newbie sewist or a master of the craft, we bet you can't help nodding along to these truths only sewers understand.
Beth Galvin
Sew
When you're making a statement in a vintage-style dress, you need to have a petticoat. It's just a fact. Petticoats can turn a simple A-line dress into a real stunner — just check out the image below.
Bluprint
Sew
Fitting can be a challenge for even the most seasoned garment sewers. But that's where a moulage, or "mold," fitting system comes in. It was developed and used in couture houses to reduce client fitting times, yet home sewers can use the technique to draft personal slopers for a blouse, dress, jacket or an overcoat.
Maris Olsen
Sew
If you're under 5'4", you're considered a size petite by the fashion industry — as well as the pattern companies industry. And when you're searching for a pattern, you want one that helps you look taller and gives great proportions to flatter your shape. Keep these tips in mind while you're browsing to help you find the perfect pattern for your next garment.
Pauline Alice
Sew
Shoulder pads add structure to the jacket so it hangs properly on the body. See how to place them and trim the shoulder edges to match. Then hand-baste the sleeves into position, stitch the sleeves into place, and make and install flannel sleeve heads.
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You're almost done! Start installing by joining the lining hem to the jacket using Kenneth's go-to stitch. Continue installing and basting the lining, and hand sew to finish. Finally, get tips for buttonholes and a final press to complete your blazer.
Sew
Construct the sleeves and finish the lower edges of your jacket. Kenneth shows you how to machine-stitch ease into the sleeve cap with buttonhole thread in the bobbin. After that, you'll construct the lapel/collar facing.
Sew
Install the facing using a combination of hand basting and machine stitching, and Kenneth's unique method for setting corner seams. From there, you'll clip curves, grade seam allowances and press. Finish by hand as you tailor-baste the layers into position.
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