Spinning
annie lupton embroidering a square knitted patch with yarn at a gray table
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No matter how many scarves and cowls you have under your belt, knitting your first sweater can be totally sweat-inducing — especially if the pattern you've chosen is riddled with a gorgeous (and intricate!) embroidery design. But knitting queen Annie Lupton, who teaches Boho Style: Embroidered Sweater, wants you to kick those first-time jitters to the curb. She gave us her best tips for overcoming any hesitations, dished on how she started blurring the lines between crafts, and shared her top secrets for knitting novices who want to begin their love affair with fiber.
Bluprint
Close up of tan hand-spun yarn
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Sometimes the sheep speak to you, telling you exactly want kind of yarn to make from their fleece. At least, that's how it went for TeDi Jansen of Small Acre Farm. While sitting in the pasture with her sheep one night, she got the urge to spin. Wishing there was a way to skip some of the prep and get to the wheel faster, the sheep gave her a brilliant idea: "prep less; let the fiber shine."
Bluprint
Woman sitting a table knitting
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You love to knit and crochet and give the things you make as gifts. At this point, everyone in your life has one of your blankets, sweaters, or hats. Your family and friends. Your UPS guy. Your neighbor. Your neighbor's baby. Your other neighbor's baby.
Kathryn Vercillo
wooden spinning wheel and a basket of fiber in a white room, with a colorful rug on the floor
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When you're first learning how to spin, you may find that things can — and, I'm sorry to say, probably will — go wrong at some point. Your yarn won't wind on, or it'll wind on too tightly. Or you may find yourself wondering helplessly, where did the end go?!
Laura Chau
Dark teal, light teal, and purple batt, gently rolled and resting a on wooden table
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We've got a thing for batts — whether you buy one ready to go, or card your own, there's no limit to the rich colors and textures you can create. It's not surprising that sometimes, a batt might just seem too beautiful to use (it's okay to admire them for awhile!). But, once you're ready to get spinning, here's what you need to know.
Ashley Martineau
Wooden spinning wheel on a white background
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A spinning wheel is a big investment, and you want to keep that spinning wheel running like a well oiled machine.
Ashley Martineau
pile of colorful yarn in hanks
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Aran? Worsted? Fingering? Figuring out yarn weights can feel like learning a whole new language. You can thank the Craft Yarn Council for that: they're the folks who determine how yarns are categorized and labeled.
Ashley Little
sleeping dog on carpe
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Pets are family, and when they pass away there's no real consolation — but here's one lovely way to remember them: You can spin their fur into yarn for a keepsake. It's a sweet way to memorialize a beloved pet, whether it's a dog, cat, bunny or any other kind of furry animal. One idea is to knit the yarn into a heart and frame it in a shadowbox, but you can do anything you like with it. Here are some ideas for how to get started.
Ashley Martineau
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Roving, rolags, batts. Wait, what language are we speaking? Ah yes, the language of spinning fibers.
Ashley Martineau
Tan and white raw wool on a wooden table
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Some people groove on the idea of spinning raw wool straight from the sheep. Things might get a little messy, but that’s part of the fun of working with natural fibers — it's what we call spinning “in the grease."
Laura Chau
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