Sweaters
You'd think that leaving a hole in your knitting is the absolute last thing you'd want to do. But actually, that's exactly what a yarn over is — an intentional hole in the middle of all kinds of beautiful knitting to create a lace pattern or an eyelet.
Ashley Little
Positive ease: Sounds like a meditation app, but it's more like a top contender for Best Knitting Term Ever. If you knit, you'll need a solid grasp of positive ease if you want to nail the right fit for your garments. Once you knit up a piece, there's usually no going back (unless you rip it out, of course) so it definitely pays to know all about how fit works before you even get started.
Ashley Little
What the heck is Aran weight yarn? If you knit or crochet, you've probably asked yourself this question. Maybe you've typed it into a search engine; maybe you've asked British friends who knit (yep, they know). Maybe you've just let the Aran mystery live on, assuming you'll solve it someday.
Ashley Little
I'll never forget my first sweater. There I was zipping along in my trusty garter stitch, feeling like a boss, when I saw it: "Inc 1." Inc wha??? I immediately started doubting myself: What made me think I could knit a sweater?!
Ashley Little
Have you ever envisioned the perfect (I mean perfect) sweater, but couldn't find a pattern for it? Or gone shopping for clothes and thought, "If only that sweater had a Peter Pan collar instead of a boatneck ... and longer sleeves ... "
Ashley Little
Hooray! You finished that sweater. But don't throw it on just yet ... block it first to help it retain its shape as you wear it. (You don't want to end up with droopy sleeves or curled up hems later on!)
Ashley Little
I thought I was going to faint the first time I saw a knitter use scissors to cut their knitted fabric. Why in the world would anyone do such a thing? I was horrified! It turns out, this knitter wasn't crazy. In fact, she knew exactly what she was doing: she was steeking, and she was steeking with a purpose.
Ashley Little
With knitting, as with fashion, everything old is new again. And as fall sweater season rolls in on a wave of apple cider and crunching leaves, we're seeing a classic style take center stage: the yoke sweater. This cozy icon traces its roots to Swedish, Icelandic and Shetland knitting traditions, with each culture offering its own unique version.
Ready to take the "eek" out of steek? Join designer Bristol Ivy and learn to knit a fabulous steeked cardigan! This knit-along gives you the chance to challenge yourself and try more advanced techniques, such as steeking, stranded colorwork, short rows and more, with the help of a supportive community of knitters. Bristol will walk you through every step, from choosing yarn colors and determining gauge to troubleshooting, while sharing tips and tricks along the way. Steeking is always better with friends, so enroll now and get ready to start stitching! The Throughstone Sweater kit is available now; just click on the Materials tab in the class for a link!
Bristol Ivy
Bristol Ivy
The idea came to me the way all great ideas do: at the eleventh hour. A few weeks before Christmas, I stumbled upon a vintage sweater pattern, and fell hard. It was an adorable bulky zippered sweater, with a figure skater on the back. I just had to make it for my figure-skating mother. But why stop there??? Down the rabbit hole I went, and soon I'd surfaced vintage sweater patterns for almost everyone on my list: from a super cool motorcycle sweater for my then boyfriend (now husband — take that, sweater curse!), to a sweet kitten for my niece, and more. So much more.
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