• Short rows are a great way to add a little shaping to a project. By turning back and forth within a row, you can create wedges and triangles within your work. You'll use short rows for sock heels, raising up the back of a sweater, bust darts, etc. Though there are many ways to work short rows, German short rows are very easy to knit, and are invisible on both sides of the work.

  • Turning the Knit Side

    1. 1. You'll usually work a short row towards the end of a row. Start by knitting as many stitches as your pattern tells you.

    2. 2. Turn your knitting so that the wrong side is facing you.

    3. 3. Slip the next stitch on your left needle purlwise (through the front loop, from right to left) onto your right needle.

    4. 4. Pull the yarn up over the top of the right needle. This will pull the stitch up and make it look like two stitches.

    5. 5. Bring the yarn under your right needle and back to the front.

    6. 6. Continue purling until it's time to work another short row.

  • Turning the Purl Side

    1. 1. When you get to the point specified in your pattern, turn your work so the right side is facing.

    2. 2. Bring your yarn to the front of the work, going under the left needle.

    3. 3. Slip the next stitch on your left needle purlwise (through the front loop, from right to left).

    4. 4. Pull the yarn up over the right needle to the back of your work. This will also pull up the stitch below, making it look like two stitches.

    5. 5. Keep the yarn in the back, and continue knitting.

  • Working the Double Stitches

    1. 1. When your pattern tells you to start knitting full rows again, you'll need to work your double stitches. On the right side of the fabric, each time you come to a double stitch, treat it as one stitch, and knit through both loops together.

    2. 2. On the purl side, each time you reach a double stitch, treat it as a single stitch, and purl through both loops together.

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    German Short Rows