Learn The Tunisian Crochet Purl Stitch

When it comes to learning Tunisian crochet, the simple stitch and knit stitch get all the attention. But without the purl stitch, those two stitches would get pretty lonely pretty quickly.

Similar to the purl stitch in knitting, the Tunisian purl stitch (abbreviated Tps) creates small purl bumps, adding structure and visual appeal to fabric. Mix that texture with other Tunisian crochet stitches for (easy!) stitch patterns that really shine.

The Tunisian purl stitch also happens to be the perfect solution to every crocheter’s worst nightmare — curling edges. Tunisian purls tend to curl in the opposite direction of other stitches, so working a few rows of purls at the beginning and end of your project can help counterbalance that curl. ( Still struggling with curling edges? We've got more tips! )

Tunisian Purl Stitch

Level: Easy

What You Need

  • Scrap yarn (since we're just practicing here, grab whatever you have lying around!)
  • Tunisian crochet hook (pick one that works with your yarn)
Stitch Refresher
Gray yarn being wrapped around a pink crochet hook
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Fingers holding gray crocheted swatch
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Directions

Before you get started, you need to work a foundation row and a standard return pass . You can make it as long or short as you want here, we're just practicing. You're ready to go when you have one loop left on your hook.

1. Bring your yarn under the hook to the front of your work.

2. Continue holding that yarn in front (using your finger to hold it in place, if you need to), and slide your hook through the vertical bar of the next stitch. In the image above, from right to left, there's the original loop on the hook, the yarn being held in place, and the vertical bar.

3. Release your grip on the working yarn, and, going under the hook, bring it to the back of the work. This creates our purl bump. Yarn over.

4. Pull the yarn over through the next stitch on the hook. You've now got two stitches on your hook, and have completed your first Tps. Hooray!

5. Keep working steps 1- 4 until the last stitch of your row. Work the Tunisian simple stitch in that final stitch.

6. Return pass as normal, and you're ready to start another row!


Good to Know

The back of the fabric looks pretty similar to the front, just with a bit more texture.


Keep Stitchin'

Now that you've got a new stitch, let's take it for a spin! The honeycomb stitch, basketweave stitch and 2x2 rib are all at your fingertips. In fact, you can even make this ribbed hat (we'll show you how)!

Ribbed Beanie
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Crochet that looks like knitting? Yes, it's possible! Master the Tunisian knit and purl stitches as you work your third and final project: a ribbed beanie. No knitting needles required! Afterwards, see how to add a fun pom-pom to finish it off.
Light blue crochet square in honeycomb pattern on a Tunisian crochet hook
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With just a handful of basic Tunisian crochet stitches in your arsenal, you can create gorgeous, texture-rich stitch patterns. From 2 x 2 ribbing (yeah, you can crochet ribbing!), to the delicious honeycomb and faux-woven basket weave stitch, there's enough here to keep your hook moving for a long time. Try any of these stitch patterns in your next crochet project — bags, scarves, and cowls all make the perfect canvas for a little something extra.
Beginner

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